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Cheap Authentic Nike Custom Washington Redskins Jerseys 2019

The Washington Redskins’ offense wasn’t exactly a juggernaut under the direction of Alex Smith in 2018, but it was efficient enough for the team to start 6-3 before the quarterback went down with a career-threatening broken leg. The team addressed uncertainty at the position by trading for veteran Case Keenum and drafting Ohio State’s Dwayne Haskins with the 15th pick.

The quarterback competition will continue to be a focal point of the offense during training camp, as will the status of tackle Trent Williams, who skipped mandatory minicamp over frustration with the team’s medical staff. But those are far from the only story lines affecting the offense before camp opens in Richmond in late July. Let’s take a look at four big questions for a unit that ranked 29th out of 32 teams in scoring offense last season.

Will Josh Doctson finally have a big year?
Doctson has something to prove, even if the wide receiver doesn’t want to look at it that way. The team declined to pick up his option, and the 2016 first-round pick is set to be an unrestricted free agent in 2020. Doctson needs to show the Redskins, and the league, that he deserves a significant deal after this season, and there’s no question the Washington offense would benefit from a breakout year from at least one member of its receiving corps.

The problem is Doctson may not get the opportunity to put up big numbers in an offense Coach Jay Gruden hopes is balanced and heavily reliant on the running game. Gruden wants to give plenty of opportunities to running backs Adrian Peterson, Derrius Guice and Chris Thompson while spreading the ball around through the air to Paul Richardson Jr., Jordan Reed, Trey Quinn, Vernon Davis and rookie Terry McLaurin, in addition to Doctson.

“I can’t promise he’s going to get a ton of opportunities with the group of guys that we have,” Gruden said. “The whole intent of this offense is to spread the ball around … and everybody taking advantage when their number is called.”
[The Redskins’ deep backfield could force coaches into some tough decisions]

Will Brandon Scherff’s contract extension get done?

Right guard Brandon Scherff has yet to agree to a contract extension as he enters the final season of his rookie deal. He’ll make $12.5 million this season after making two Pro Bowls and the all-rookie team in his first four years. Scherff had been durable — he played 46 of 48 games in his first three seasons — before a torn pectoral muscle landed him on injured reserve after eight games last season. Pro Football Focus ranked Scherff as the ninth-best guard in 2017 and No. 14 during his injury-shortened 2018.

Team president Bruce Allen has said that extending Scherff is a priority, and he is likely to command a top-five salary at the position. The Dallas Cowboys’ Zack Martin is the highest-paid guard in the league; he has a six-year, $84 million contract.
Scherff could gamble and wait to sign a multiyear extension until after the new collective bargaining agreement is signed. Former Redskins salary cap analyst J.I. Halsell said Scherff could decline a long-term deal, force the team to use the franchise tag on him for the 2020 season and negotiate a multiyear contract worth more money under the new CBA.

[The Redskins view Ereck Flowers as potential starter at left guard]

Will Samaje Perine see any playing time?

Gruden continues to praise the running back, insisting the 2017 fourth-round pick deserves more chances. But how? Running backs coach Randy Jordan has said he envisions a 50-50 or 60-40 split between Peterson and Guice, with Thompson getting snaps in passing situations. That doesn’t leave a whole lot of opportunity for Perine.

“Samaje really has been the guy that has been most impressive,” Gruden said during minicamp. “He’s been out here taking all the reps. He’s really improved in not only the running game but also in the passing game. . . . He’s a powerful running back and he has not had the opportunities that he probably deserves or needs.”
The Redskins made something of a surprise move last fall when they kept five running backs. The numbers could be interesting again with fourth-round pick Bryce Love joining the fold once he recovers from a torn ACL.

[Dwayne Haskins could start Week 1, and more Redskins offseason takeaways]

Will Trey Quinn excel as the slot receiver?

Expectations were low for Quinn when he was the last pick of the 2018 draft, but he quickly impressed with good hands and precise route running during workouts and training camp. Ankle injuries landed him on injured reserve twice, but he is poised to replace Jamison Crowder as the starting slot receiver.

“Trey’s done an excellent job,” Gruden said. “He’s come in here and stepped to the head of the class as far as his position is concerned and done a great job. He understands raw concepts, he’s physical, he’s got strong hands, he can separate, and he can block. He’s also a punt returner for us, so he’s a valuable member of our team right now. . . . That slot position is critical for us.”

That’s a lot of praise for a seventh-round pick with three games of NFL experience and nine career receptions, but Quinn continues to make believers of those around him.

Cheap Nike Washington Redskins Dwayne Haskins Jersey Authentic 2019

By the beginning of this past week, Ohio State quarterback Dwayne Haskins knew he was going to end up with the Washington Redskins. The NFL draft was still days away, but the chatter, speculation and blather streaming out of the television screen and all over the Internet meant nothing to him anymore. He already was at peace with his future.

“It was just [a matter of] trying to figure out what time and what pick,” Haskins said Saturday afternoon.

He was standing on the steps of the Jefferson Memorial, which he had visited many times as a child growing up in New Jersey and later as a high school student at the Bullis School in Potomac. Saturday’s trip was a publicity stunt set up by the Redskins to introduce their new franchise quarterback and his fellow first-round pick, edge rusher Montez Sweat, to Washington. But gazing around on this brilliant spring afternoon, with the Washington Monument towering behind him and a brisk wind whipping whitecaps on the tidal basin, he didn’t feel any need to be introduced.
He was home, he said, in the only place he expected to be through four months of draft speculation.

qb 7 Dwayne Haskins Washington Redskins
Montez Sweat Washington Redskins
wr Terry McLaurin Washington Redskins
rb Bryce Love Washington Redskins
Wes Martin Washington Redskins

[Redskins pick-by-pick draft analysis: Washington adds playmakers Kelvin Harmon, Bryce Love on Day 3]

It’s hard to pinpoint the moment when the Redskins decided that Haskins would be the quarterback to lead the franchise into the 2020s. Maybe it came during meetings with team leaders at the NFL scouting combine in early March; Haskins remembers having good talks then. Perhaps it was at Ohio State’s pro day later in March, when Redskins Coach Jay Gruden and offensive coordinator Kevin O’Connell showed up to watch him throw. It could have been that dinner at D.C. Prime this month during his visit to the Redskins’ team facility in Ashburn; he and Gruden devoured their steaks, and the coach kept cracking jokes.
“I clicked well with all the teams I visited. I felt like the team that liked me the most was the Redskins,” he said. “I could just tell by the vibe I got from all the teams. They loved me a little bit more.”

He smiled.

“It all made sense,” he said.
Haskins and fellow first-round pick Montez Sweat show off their new jerseys. (Jonathan Newton/The Washington Post)
There has been rampant speculation about whether Haskins was really the choice of Washington’s coaches or whether he had become the infatuation of team owner Daniel Snyder, whose son was a few years behind Haskins at Bullis. That Snyder called Haskins on Thursday night to say the Redskins were selecting him with the 15th pick speaks to how invested the owner was in the selection. But suggesting Snyder alone determined the Redskins’ path would ignore many other connections Haskins has with the team, and it would overlook the impression the team’s coaches gave him as the draft drew closer.

Haskins said he loved his chats with quarterbacks coach Tim Rattay. His meetings with Gruden were filled with complicated dialogue about X’s and O’s.

When asked Thursday night whether Haskins was the team’s top-rated quarterback in this draft — which began with Arizona selecting Oklahoma’s Kyler Murray — Gruden quickly nodded.

“Oh, yeah,” he said. “For sure.”

[Draft preview: Haskins is eager for his opportunity, wherever it may be]

Ohio State’s pro day might have been what sold Washington on Haskins. Gruden, who did not attend many of the other top quarterback prospects’ pre-draft workouts, carefully watched Haskins’s feet. One of the biggest criticisms of Haskins, other than that he was a one-year starter in college, is that he is slow and has a long, deliberate windup. Both are considered negatives in today’s NFL; pass rushers are so fast and powerful that quarterbacks must do everything with haste.
But watching him at his workout, Gruden was struck by how quickly Haskins moved, and he noticed that passes left his hand much more rapidly than they did on video.

“Exciting,” Gruden thought.

Not only was Haskins faster than he might have appeared on screen, he was accurate, too.

“[Pro day] helped,” Gruden said. “But it was just all part of the process. When you’re thinking about taking a quarterback, it is important to go check out some pro days. Our coaching staff, whoever it is, we handle all the pro days of all quarterbacks this year. Somebody was at all of them, obviously, and I think that played a big part of it.”

Haskins said nobody from the Redskins told him he was going to be their choice, but the decision soon became obvious to him. He brushed away the suggestion that he had a connection with Snyder, saying he barely knew Snyder’s son in high school and didn’t meet the owner until the draft process. If anything, that his mentor is former Redskins star cornerback Shawn Springs might have had a greater impact. For years, Springs — who met Haskins at a quarterback camp in New Jersey years ago and brought the family to live with him at one point — had been trying to tell Redskins executives about the quarterback who spent some time in the D.C. area and was going to star at his old school, Ohio State. No one seemed to pay much attention.
Even when Springs cornered Snyder before a game at FedEx Field last fall and pleaded for the owner to consider Haskins, he wasn’t sure Snyder knew whom he was talking about. Springs pushed on anyway. Then last month at the NFL’s annual meeting in Phoenix, Springs found team president Bruce Allen and begged him to pick Haskins.
A group of tourists, from Anchor Bay Middle School in New Baltimore, Mich., stopped to watch Saturday’s news conference. (Jonathan Newton/The Washington Post)
By then, though, everyone around the Redskins knew about Haskins. Murray, the Heisman Trophy winner, was all but certain to go first to the Cardinals, and despite having interest in trading for quarterback Josh Rosen, Arizona’s first-round pick last year, any enthusiasm for him appeared to have died by Thursday.

Gruden said the Redskins had a few quarterbacks in mind because they weren’t sure Haskins would fall to the 15th pick.

“You never really make up your mind on one guy,” he said, “because you have a tendency to get your heart broken if that guy gets picked.”
Still, the Redskins had a good idea Haskins would be theirs if they were patient. The New York Giants, whom Haskins had been linked to all winter, had fallen in love with Duke’s Daniel Jones and were certain to use the sixth pick on him. When they did, Haskins was not surprised. Two picks earlier, his agent had told him it would happen. Haskins noted that with a dryness that suggested he would not forget the slight.

“I’m just looking forward to being able to compete against those guys for the rest of my career,” he said Thursday.

“He’s going to be a beast when he plays the Giants,” Springs said with a laugh.

Once New York made its move, the other teams that might need a quarterback and were set to pick before the Redskins, such as Denver and Miami, appeared focused elsewhere.

“When whoever picked in front of us didn’t pick him, it was pretty much solidified,” Gruden said with a laugh. “It’s really hard because you’re sitting there and you want a guy, but you have to wait. It happens every year. You can’t trade up and get everybody; you won’t have any picks left. [You want] to keep the picks that we have because we were able to get some more players.”
When it was the Redskins’ turn, the choice that had become obvious was quickly made. Snyder got on the phone. At a Gaithersburg bowling alley, Haskins took the call — and wasn’t at all surprised to hear Snyder’s voice.

It was the phone call he had been expecting all along.