Monthly Archives: October 2017

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California Arameda – Auckland Raiders plans to have 13 unrestricted free agents after the season, the team in the 12-4 season after the outbreak, since 2002 for the first time since the playoffs.

Offline: Attack lineman Menelik Watson, tight end of Mychal Rivera, accepted Andre Holmes, quarterback Matt McGloin, ran back to Latavis Murray.

Defensive: defender David Hayden, defensive magic Steits McGee, line guard Malcolm Smith, Perry Riley and Darren Bates and Nate Allen and Brynden Trawick security defense.

There are special teams: the flute team Jon Condo.
Informant defender Miss Perry Riley in the playoffs won the commando veteran leader. Photos from Ezra Shaw / Getty Images
Perry Riley Jr.

Age: 28

2016 Base salary: $ 1 million

Why should he stay: Signed off the street on Oct. 4 after four games, Riley, who spent his first six seasons in Washington, front “help washing the middle of the Raiders defense after Ben Heeney was lost for the season with injury and rookie Cory James was unable to solidify things. Riley’s 62 tackles in 11 games – he missed the Carolina Panthers game with a hamstring injury – accepted six on the team and he forced a fumble on his first series as a Raider. He forced another fumble in the Raiders ‘playoff-clinching victory on Dec. 18 at San Diego and by the time the season ended, he was a 12-game starter in Oakland, including the playoffs, and had the green dot on his helmet as the team’s defensive signal-caller.

Why is he any go: Yes, Riley settlement things down for the Raiders defense, but it was still ranked No. 26 unit in the NFL. So is that a testament to Riley’s ability or a shot at how poor the Defense played? That depends upon how to look at things. Riley had two passes defensed, but he did not have a sack or an interception while starting 11 regular-season games and the playoff loss at the Houston Texans. Riley fits the mold of a journeyman and he will be 29 with a lot of mileage on him come next season.

“I love this place. Like I said, the team, the fans, opened their arms for me and Welcome me with open arms. I loved it here, so if everything works out, perfect scenario, definitely I’d come back. “- Riley, on the prospect of returning to Oakland in 2017.

The idea: Riley, with the outside line guard Bruce Owen childhood friend, is the last season in the line of the best players. So it is worthwhile to bring Riley back again, unless they draft an upgrade that is ready to make an immediate contribution, sign one in a free agency, or get an upgrade in a deal.

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ASHBURN, Virginia — It’s hard to know the impact Washington Redskins linebacker Junior Galette will make Sunday or this season as a whole; so much depends upon his health. Aside from a minor hamstring issue in camp, Galette has been healthy, but when you haven’t played in two years, questions always will be asked.

But he’s stood out to teammates in practice and he does have a history of success, though he last played in 2014. Still, the Redskins are anticipating success with him, and he looked good enough in the preseason to indicate they just might be right.

A big key for Galette will be that he can throw a change-up at a blocker. For example, if a tackle must block Ryan Kerrigan for three or four snaps, the Redskins can then line Galette up in the same spot. Galette is more explosive than Kerrigan; it could lead to a curveball that benefits Washington.
Junior Galette’s explosiveness and speed can present problems for opponents trying to block him. Brad Mills/USA TODAY Sports
Also, they now have the ability to pair Galette’s speed off the ball with power on a stunt, something the Redskins haven’t had in recent years. A Galette-Preston Smith pairing could lead to fun games up front. Also, against mobile Eagles’ quarterback Carson Wentz, Galette’s quickness will help.

“We expect him to come out and play well, be a great pass-rusher for us,” Redskins coach Jay Grduen said of Galette. “He’s hungry. He’s been dying to get back on the field. He’s excited to play so I’m excited to watch him play. Hopefully we get them in some third-and-longs to get him an opportunity to rush. That’ll be the key for us. Let him get his hand on the ground and come around the corner like he does so well.”

Galette said his hamstring issues are long gone. He said from the time camp opened to now, he’s feeling much better — more explosive, better hand-eye coordination on rush moves.

“Everything’s different. It’s night and day,” he said.

And after two years of no games, he said he didn’t have trouble sleeping leading up to his return Sunday against the Eagles.

“I had trouble sleeping when I wasn’t around football,” he said.

Other notes:

Stick to the ground: The Redskins always have been patient with their run game against the Eagles. In six games vs. them under Jay Gruden, they’ve averaged 28.5 carries per game. They know that Philadelphia’s defense leads to some negative runs, but also provides openings for big gains.

Indeed, last season the Redskins averaged 6.02 yards per carry vs. the Eagles. But they lost yards on 10 of their 58 carries.

The Eagles use a wide-nine front in which an end aligns outside the tight end and the front’s goal is to get upfield fast. That leads to penetration and, sometimes, tackles for a loss. In that second game, for example, on Chris Thompson’s 25-yard touchdown run the Eagles had five defenders one yard across the line of scrimmage after the snap. But the Redskins called a quick pitch to the outside and, with one blocker ahead of him (tackle Trent Williams), Thompson scored untouched.

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On 10 of Rob Kelley’s 16 carries in that game, at least one defender was across the line at the snap — and more often than not there were two or three. But it created lanes elsewhere.

“It forces the back to make a decision earlier than normal,” Kelley said. “I also think it’s a benefit. It helps your reads out early and if this guy shoots upfield, you know where to go. If they have something they’re good at, [we] do have something that can beat it.”

Lane Johnson’s return. The Eagles’ right tackle did not play against Washington last season; Kerrigan, who rushes from that side, recorded three sacks and a forced fumble to clinch the second win. But Kerrigan knows with Johnson back, he’ll have a more challenging day.

“He’s so athletic and a big guy,” Kerrigan said. “He’s a tough matchup in that regard. … Their line is really athletic.”

Covering Sproles: Redskins linebacker Zach Brown said facing running back Chris Thompson every day in practice during one-on-one drills, or during team work in training camp, helps prepare him to defend a back such as Darren Sproles. It’ll be the first time Brown will face Sproles.

“He’s a good player,” Brown said. “I’ve guarded a lot of people like him. He’s still a running back; he’s not a receiver. He’s more quick than fast. With Chris, he’s more explosive and fast out of his cuts. Once he goes, he can go. He can go from zero to 100. It makes me get going faster so when I go against people like Sproles, when he breaks I can be on him faster and get to my top speed faster than he gets to his.”

More knowledge: Ziggy Hood started at nose tackle last season out of necessity after Kedric Golston was lost for the season in Week 2. Hood is a natural end, but had to play inside just as he’s doing this season. But the difference? He’s now prepared.

Plus, line coach Jim Tomsula is far more nuanced and detailed in his coaching techniques. That, too, should help. Hood said he’s helped him with his footwork, how to keep them chopping and moving in the middle and not just being suckered into getting upfield and having them hit the other gap.

Hood also had to get used to worrying about three linemen possibly blocking him: both guards and the center. At end, he usually had to be concerned with just two blockers.

“I react a whole lot faster now,” Hood said. “I’m able to back up from the ball and see everything and critique it because I’ve had so many reps at it. Last year I didn’t have any reps. I had the chance to play it in the preseason and that’s a tell-tale sign: This is what I need to work on leading up to the season. I didn’t have that last season. It’s a huge difference.”

 

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The Washington Redskins must cut their roster to 53 by 4 p.m. ET Saturday, Sept. 2. Here’s a final 53-man roster projection:

Quarterback (2): Kirk Cousins, Colt McCoy

That leaves Nate Sudfeld out. Coach Jay Gruden has been OK in the past carrying just two quarterbacks, and they could probably get Sudfeld back on the practice squad to keep him around and develop. If they believe they can’t sign him to the practice squad, he could earn a roster spot. And if they believe he’s worth grooming as an eventual starter, then he won’t be cut. There were definite mixed feelings about that topic. But keeping him means releasing someone who might be able to help now, probably a defensive player.
Nate Sudfield (left) might join Kirk Cousins and Colt McCoy on the active roster if they don’t believe he’d get through waivers and onto the practice squad. Steve Helber/AP
Running back (4): Rob Kelley, Chris Thompson, Samaje Perine, Mack Brown

That leaves veteran Matt Jones, who opened last season as the starter, finally getting what he wanted: his release. Jones wasn’t going to beat out Kelley or Perine and Brown adds a special-teams element. Brown would be the odd man out if they kept only three backs.

Tight end (4): Jordan Reed, Vernon Davis, Niles Paul, Jeremy Sprinkle

The Redskins talked to teams about trading Carrier, but to no avail. He can easily make a case for deserving a roster spot. He’s been one of the top four tight ends in camp. But the Redskins like Sprinkle because they see him as a rarity: a true Y tight end because of his size. More tight ends being drafted are akin to Reed, a receiver-type who can move around. Paul’s versatility matters — he can play fullback and special teams.

Offensive line (8): Trent Williams, Shawn Lauvao, Spencer Long, Brandon Scherff, Morgan Moses, Ty Nsekhe, Chase Roullier, Kyle Kalis

The question will be: Do the Redskins eventually sign another veteran interior backup and bump Kalis (or Tyler Catalina, if he makes it) to the practice squad? Roullier played well all summer, but he and Kalis are rookies. Nsekhe is a tackle. They could use an experienced vet to back up inside. Roullier has been one of the Redskins’ most impressive rookies. The starting lineup is set.

Receiver (6): Jamison Crowder, Terrelle Pryor, Josh Doctson, Ryan Grant, Brian Quick, Robert Davis

Quick and Davis receive the final two spots and Maurice Harris does not because they can help on more special-teams units — both Quick and Davis have been used throughout the summer at gunner, for example. Both are big and physical; Harris is tall, but does not play as physically and is mostly limited to being a backup returner. Because of Doctson’s hamstring issues, it’s good for Washington to have an experienced backup such as Quick (who did not look sharp in the spring, but improved this summer). Harris didn’t do much of anything this summer because of a knee injury. They’d be smart to keep Harris on the practice squad and continue developing him.

Defensive line (7): Ziggy Hood, Jonathan Allen, Matt Ioannidis, Terrell McClain, Stacy McGee, Anthony Lanier, Joey Mbu

Phil Taylor Sr. would have been on the roster if not for a season-ending torn quad. That left Mbu and A.J. Francis fighting for the potential last spot (unless they only keep six). The rest of the group was easy to pick. If Mbu doesn’t make it, he could warrant a practice-squad spot. McClain has not had a strong summer, but is too expensive to cut. Ioannidis has been their starting nickel tackle, along with Allen. Lanier is worth developing more and the Redskins believe Hood sets the tone for this group with his approach. If they go with six linemen and no Mbu (nor Francis), then they could use a rotation at nose tackle with Hood and McGee — or claim someone off waivers.

Linebacker (9): Ryan Kerrigan, Preston Smith, Junior Galette, Ryan Anderson, Chris Carter, Zach Brown, Mason Foster, Will Compton, Martrell Spaight

This group was relatively easy to pick, as a lot hinged on whether Spaight got through camp healthy. Carter can play inside or outside and helps on special teams. Also, with Anderson still sidelined with a stinger injury, Carter can provide help as a fourth outside linebacker. This means cutting draft pick Josh Harvey-Clemons and undrafted Nico Marley. Harvey-Clemons was making a transition from safety and has more to learn; the practice squad would be a good place for him. Marley’s energy would help there, too.

 

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Secondary (10): Josh Norman, Bashaud Breeland, Kendall Fuller, Fabian Moreau, Quinton Dunbar, Josh Holsey, D.J. Swearinger, Su’a Cravens, Deshazor Everett, Montae Nicholson
Expect DeAngelo Hall to remain on the physically unable to perform list when the season begins. Holsey’s play this summer forced the Redskins to keep six corners. But it meant having to cut veteran Will Blackmon, a versatile player who can play safety or corner. It leaves them somewhat inexperienced at safety, with Cravens not having yet played the spot in an NFL game and Nicholson a rookie. Everett’s special-teams play warrants a spot. If they only keep six defensive linemen, then Blackmon could find a spot as a fifth safety.

Specialists (3): Tress Way, Dustin Hopkins, Nick Sundberg

Considering the Redskins didn’t bring in competition for anyone in this group, their spots are safe. However, Hopkins did not have a strong year last season (81-percent rate on field goals) and, despite his youth and strong leg, must be more consistent. With kickers and punters, job security is a week-to-week gig.

 

 

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IRVINE, Calif. — It has been eight years since veteran center John Sullivan joined legendary quarterback Brett Favre on the Minnesota Vikings, the last stop in what became a Hall of Fame career.

But hearing Favre’s name still makes Sullivan’s right buttock sting.

“He used to smack your ass so hard,” Sullivan, now the Los Angeles Rams’ starting center, said after a recent practice. “You’d be standing in a walk-through and you had to keep your head on a swivel because you just knew if Brett came up behind you, you were getting one, and you were going to have a handprint on there for a couple days.”

Sullivan was Favre’s center in 2009, the year he made the Pro Bowl and led the Vikings to the NFC Championship Game at the age of 40. He still laughs at all the times Favre used to make stuff up as he went along. Like that one two-minute drill in Pittsburgh, when Favre didn’t bother calling plays or protections. At one point he barked instructions to one of his receivers, yelled at Sullivan to snap him the ball and completed a five-yard out. The offense and defense was so flat-footed that the linemen didn’t even make contact with one another.

“He was an amazing player in terms of having a very natural feel for the game; instincts,” said Sullivan, also Favre’s center during his final season in 2010. “You talk about a youthful exuberance about the sport — he was 40 years old and he was playing like he was a 10-year-old kid in the backyard. It was refreshing for everybody. I was a 23-year-old kid fresh out of college, and even for me it was refreshing at that point in time.”

Sullivan, now 32, is surrounded by youth these days. His quarterback, Jared Goff, is 22, the youngest among the 10 players Sullivan has ever snapped the ball to in an NFL game. His boss, Sean McVay, is 31, the youngest head coach in NFL history.

Sullivan played under McVay last year, when McVay was in his last of three years as the Redskins’ offensive coordinator. Back issues began to plague Sullivan after a six-year run of being one of the game’s better centers from 2009 to ’14, a stretch when he started 93 of a possible 96 regular-season games. He spent all of the 2015 season on injured reserve, the product of two back surgeries, then lost the starting job in 2016 and was released at the end of August.
Rams center John Sullivan on Sean McVay: “He’s an incredible motivator, amazing with the X’s and O’s, and so far proving himself as a great head coach in terms of leading this organization and changing the culture …” Kirby Lee/USA TODAY Sports
The Redskins picked him up on Sept. 27, shortly after starter Kory Lichtensteiger injured his calf. It was a Tuesday, heading into Week 4, the day of the Redskins’ walk-through. Sullivan flew into Washington, D.C., that morning, worked out, signed his contract and went straight into an offensive meeting before even having a chance to text his wife.

There, he met McVay.

“You’re going to these offensive install meetings, and he is so on the screws on every single detail,” Sullivan said. “But he’s not micromanaging. It’s just pointing out things that you can be looking for, and really coaching in the classroom in terms of being detail-oriented. He was incredibly impressive. I didn’t know his age at that point. I didn’t know he was 30. And even to this day, it doesn’t make any difference. He’s an incredible motivator, amazing with the X’s and O’s, and so far proving himself as a great head coach in terms of leading this organization and changing the culture, and making sure that everybody buys into our message. That’s just a connected team, with a ‘We Not Me’ slogan.”

Sullivan started only one game during that 2016 season, then re-joined McVay with the Rams, where he will replace former starter Tim Barnes at center. McVay believes Sullivan is fully healthy now. His presence in the room, with the knowledge he has of his offense, “has helped immensely,” McVay said.

“He’s one of the more impressive players I’ve ever been around, just in terms of his above the neck and the way that he’s able to translate things from the meeting room to the grass,” McVay went on about Sullivan. “He truly is one of those linemen — like we talk about with the quarterbacks — that’s an extension of the coaching staff. He’s got a great grasp of what we want to get done. He knows why, so he’s able to help his teammates out. He’s been a breath of fresh air.”

 

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More than the offense, though, Sullivan knows McVay. He knows his thought process on protections, he knows the way his offenses function, and he knows how he likes to attack. McVay is trying to do for the Rams what he did for the Redskins, even though his new personnel is significantly younger and less accomplished. He’s going from Jordan Reed and Vernon Davis to Tyler Higbee and Gerald Everett, two tight ends who have combined for 11 career catches. He’s going from Kirk Cousins to Goff, who’s coming off a disastrous rookie season. He’s going from DeSean Jackson and Pierre Garcon to Sammy Watkins and Robert Woods, two former Bills teammates together again on the Rams.
“We scored a ton of points last year, and that’s the expectation here in Los Angeles now is we’re going to do that exact same thing,” Sullivan said. “We’re going to use all the facets of the game to attack teams, and we’re going to try to put defenses on their heels, make them defend the entire field.”

It’s been a long time since the Rams put opposing defenses on their heels. They have finished outside the top 20 in defense-adjusted value over average after each of the past 10 seasons. The past two years, they were last in the NFL in yards. This past season — a 4-12 season — they were held below 300 total yards in 10 games. Sullivan isn’t willing to set concrete expectations for what McVay can do for this offense, but he is confident in one thing.

“We’re not going to be an easy out for any defense we play,” Sullivan said. “We’re going to come out, we’re going to attack you, and we’re going to execute as well as we possibly can. We’re very process-oriented. We focus on coming out here and working the right way every single day. And the belief is that if you do that, the results will follow. We’ll see.”

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The Washington Redskins must cut their roster to 53 by 4 p.m. ET Saturday, Sept. 2. Here’s a final 53-man roster projection:

Quarterback (2): Kirk Cousins, Colt McCoy

That leaves Nate Sudfeld out. Coach Jay Gruden has been OK in the past carrying just two quarterbacks, and they could probably get Sudfeld back on the practice squad to keep him around and develop. If they believe they can’t sign him to the practice squad, he could earn a roster spot. And if they believe he’s worth grooming as an eventual starter, then he won’t be cut. There were definite mixed feelings about that topic. But keeping him means releasing someone who might be able to help now, probably a defensive player.
Nate Sudfield (left) might join Kirk Cousins and Colt McCoy on the active roster if they don’t believe he’d get through waivers and onto the practice squad. Steve Helber/AP
Running back (4): Rob Kelley, Chris Thompson, Samaje Perine, Mack Brown

That leaves veteran Matt Jones, who opened last season as the starter, finally getting what he wanted: his release. Jones wasn’t going to beat out Kelley or Perine and Brown adds a special-teams element. Brown would be the odd man out if they kept only three backs.

Tight end (4): Jordan Reed, Vernon Davis, Niles Paul, Jeremy Sprinkle

The Redskins talked to teams about trading Carrier, but to no avail. He can easily make a case for deserving a roster spot. He’s been one of the top four tight ends in camp. But the Redskins like Sprinkle because they see him as a rarity: a true Y tight end because of his size. More tight ends being drafted are akin to Reed, a receiver-type who can move around. Paul’s versatility matters — he can play fullback and special teams.

Offensive line (8): Trent Williams, Shawn Lauvao, Spencer Long, Brandon Scherff, Morgan Moses, Ty Nsekhe, Chase Roullier, Kyle Kalis

The question will be: Do the Redskins eventually sign another veteran interior backup and bump Kalis (or Tyler Catalina, if he makes it) to the practice squad? Roullier played well all summer, but he and Kalis are rookies. Nsekhe is a tackle. They could use an experienced vet to back up inside. Roullier has been one of the Redskins’ most impressive rookies. The starting lineup is set.

Receiver (6): Jamison Crowder, Terrelle Pryor, Josh Doctson, Ryan Grant, Brian Quick, Robert Davis

Quick and Davis receive the final two spots and Maurice Harris does not because they can help on more special-teams units — both Quick and Davis have been used throughout the summer at gunner, for example. Both are big and physical; Harris is tall, but does not play as physically and is mostly limited to being a backup returner. Because of Doctson’s hamstring issues, it’s good for Washington to have an experienced backup such as Quick (who did not look sharp in the spring, but improved this summer). Harris didn’t do much of anything this summer because of a knee injury. They’d be smart to keep Harris on the practice squad and continue developing him.

Defensive line (7): Ziggy Hood, Jonathan Allen, Matt Ioannidis, Terrell McClain, Stacy McGee, Anthony Lanier, Joey Mbu

Phil Taylor Sr. would have been on the roster if not for a season-ending torn quad. That left Mbu and A.J. Francis fighting for the potential last spot (unless they only keep six). The rest of the group was easy to pick. If Mbu doesn’t make it, he could warrant a practice-squad spot. McClain has not had a strong summer, but is too expensive to cut. Ioannidis has been their starting nickel tackle, along with Allen. Lanier is worth developing more and the Redskins believe Hood sets the tone for this group with his approach. If they go with six linemen and no Mbu (nor Francis), then they could use a rotation at nose tackle with Hood and McGee — or claim someone off waivers.

Linebacker (9): Ryan Kerrigan, Preston Smith, Junior Galette, Ryan Anderson, Chris Carter, Zach Brown, Mason Foster, Will Compton, Martrell Spaight

This group was relatively easy to pick, as a lot hinged on whether Spaight got through camp healthy. Carter can play inside or outside and helps on special teams. Also, with Anderson still sidelined with a stinger injury, Carter can provide help as a fourth outside linebacker. This means cutting draft pick Josh Harvey-Clemons and undrafted Nico Marley. Harvey-Clemons was making a transition from safety and has more to learn; the practice squad would be a good place for him. Marley’s energy would help there, too.

 

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Secondary (10): Josh Norman, Bashaud Breeland, Kendall Fuller, Fabian Moreau, Quinton Dunbar, Josh Holsey, D.J. Swearinger, Su’a Cravens, Deshazor Everett, Montae Nicholson
Expect DeAngelo Hall to remain on the physically unable to perform list when the season begins. Holsey’s play this summer forced the Redskins to keep six corners. But it meant having to cut veteran Will Blackmon, a versatile player who can play safety or corner. It leaves them somewhat inexperienced at safety, with Cravens not having yet played the spot in an NFL game and Nicholson a rookie. Everett’s special-teams play warrants a spot. If they only keep six defensive linemen, then Blackmon could find a spot as a fifth safety.

Specialists (3): Tress Way, Dustin Hopkins, Nick Sundberg

Considering the Redskins didn’t bring in competition for anyone in this group, their spots are safe. However, Hopkins did not have a strong year last season (81-percent rate on field goals) and, despite his youth and strong leg, must be more consistent. With kickers and punters, job security is a week-to-week gig.